LIGHT INDUCED PROCESSES IN MOLECULAR SYSTEMS AND NOVEL MATERIALS - PART I: TIME-RESOLVED SPECTROSCOPY


Date

19.06.2019, 26.06.2019,
03.07.2019, 10.07.2019

Time

09.00 am - 11.00 a.m.

Lecturer

Tönu Pullerits
(Lund University)

Stefan Lochbrunner
(University of Rostock)

Oliver Kühn
(University of Rostock)

Number of participants

about 20

Location

Albert-Einstein-Str. 25
Seminar room Life, Light & Matter,
SR 110

Language

English

Target audience

Master and PhD students and postdocs in Life Sciences, Chemistry

Course description

Light induced processes in molecular systems and in materials are currently subject of intense research activities and play a crucial role for a wide range of recent and future applications. This includes photocatalysis, solar cells, photoswitches, light harvesting and sensing in life sciences, imaging, and information processing.

Time-resolved spectroscopy and its advanced derivatives such as two-dimensional spectroscopy are central and wide-spread techniques to investigate light induced processes. The workshop gives an introduction and overview about the basics and application of these techniques.

The format is a combination of lectures and journal club. The lecturers will first give an introduction to a specific topic, then the students will read a key publication in which the presented concepts, processes, or methods are applied to problems in chemistry, biology, or medicine. These applications are then discussed in a seminar.

Flyer

Topics

  • Basics of timeresolved spectroscopy
  • Pumpprobe approach, analysis and interpretation
  • theoretical concepts, potential energy surfaces, quantum dynamics, kinetics
  • Multidimensional spectroscopy
  • Phase matching directions, analysis of signals for simple systems
  • Application to charge and energy transfer in biological and material systems

Information about the lecturers

Prof. Tönu Pullerits from the Department of Chemistry, Lund University, Lund, Sweden is an expert in two-dimensional spectroscopy of biological and functional nanosystems.

Prof. Stefan Lochbrunner from the Institute for Physics of the University of Rostock and his coworkers apply time-resolved spectroscopy to photocatalysis, photoreactions, and exciton dynamics.

Prof. Oliver Kühn from the Institute for Physics of the University of Rostock and his coworkers investigate the dynamics in molecular and biological systems with ab-initio calculations and molecular dynamics simulations.